• Little about us

    Statement of Purpose

    BLT is a non-profit organization for the development of interest in drama as an educational and entertainment medium for the public as well as a source of experience and pleasure for those participating actively in the work. The object of this organization is to promote better drama, to extend cultural and entertainment opportunities to the community and to instruct interested persons in dramatic techniques. Bainbridge Little Theatre is a 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions (above and beyond regular ticket price per play) at the Sustaining Patron level and above are tax deductible. Four plays per season ticket.

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    Our History

    Once upon a time ...

    I was conducting one show and seated at the left side next to the stage. I looked down and, behold; there on the edge of the stage was a live cricket. I reached down and quickly put it in the pocket of my tuxedo. At intermission I took it outside and released it. I was sure then that the BLT was blessed with good luck.


    In 1974 the college had been open for a little more than a year. BC began plans for a theatre organization because Bainbridge did not have one. So the Humanities Division and Continuing Education began to address the issue. Of course, there was no theatre facility at this time. Bainbridge College agreed to house and support the theatre until it could one day fly on its own.


    The three faculty who organized the theatre were Dr. Eunice Knight, Dr. Michael Gast, and Mrs. Dottie Randall. The BLT was established, and the first show was “Barefoot in the Park,” presented in 1974. The first “stars” were Ed Marsicano, Ksena Zipperer, Helen Kelley, Basil Lucas, Larry Nichols and Adelaine Wolf. (Incidentally, the high school student ushers were Bruce Kirbo, Steve Poitevent, Ronnie Martin, Joe Livingston, Pete Miller and Jan Kres.) Eunice Knight directed.


    During the early days The BLT had no regular place to perform. The American Legion, the VFW, Shrine Club, Elcan-King school, Bainbridge College, and even the old library building all served this new theatre effort. But, BLT needed a home. One of the BLT supporters was Max Langston, who was the Pepsi Cola dealer in the area. The success of Max and his products needed a larger facility, so Max gave the BLT his building on Troupe Street. I chaired a small group called “Friends of the Theater” and we sold each of the seats for $300, which raised almost $50,000. I attended a meeting of the Decatur County Commissioners and asked them for $30,000. They granted the request.


    We planned for the first show in the new facility and it was “Class Act.” This was a show of our own invention because we couldn’t trust a published show not knowing the various dimensions and spaces of the new theatre. It was a huge success! We knew we had a gem of a 160-seat theatre. And, the acoustics are beautiful!


    There are presently three or four shows each year, plus other special events. BLT’S Troupe Street Theatre has been improved over the years with the addition of curtains, a concert grand piano, additional space backstage, and a formal garden for al fresco receptions. BLT is not only a place for entertainment and celebration of the arts but a source of pride for the community who built it.


    -- Dr. Ed Mobley

  • Tickets

    Ticket Information

    Adults

    Students

    Musicals

    Adults

    Students

     

    $15.00

    $10.00

     

    $18.00

    $13.00

    Reserve Tickets by Phone

    We begin taking reservations for non-patrons the Friday (six days) before opening night. During that week, you can reserve your tickets online. You may call (229) 246-8345 Monday through Friday 1pm - 6pm or email bainbridgelittletheatre@gmail.com if you need help with your reservations.

    Season Gift Subscriptions

    A subscription to the current season may be purchased as a gift by clicking above. We will send the recipient a letter stating that a season subscription has been purchased , and that it is a gift from you!

    Season Tickets

    $1,000.00

    Benefactor

    Individual or Cooperate support receives four (4) season tickets, recognition in the lobby, plus Sustaining Patron benefits.


    $500.00

    Star Patron

    Star Patrons receive two (2) season tickets, recognition in our lobby, and Sustaining Patron benefits.


    $125.00

    Gold Patron

    Gold Patrons receive one (1) season ticket, recognition in our lobby, as well as receiving Sustaining Patron benefits.


    $80.00

    Sustaining Patron

    Sustaining Patrons receive one (1) season ticket. They join us at the Annual Patron’s Party, at the wine and cheese festivities before every opening night, and are celebrated in our programs.


    $60.00

    Patron

    Patrons receive one (1) season ticket. They join us at the Annual Patron’s party and are celebrated in our programs.


    $50.00

    Subscriber

    Subscribers receive one (1) season ticket. Our Subscribers are greatly appreciated.


    $25.00

    Student

    Students receive one (1) season ticket (must show student ID). Student (full-time) available to grade school, high school and college students. BHS students receive credit in English class for attending plays.

  • Patron's Party

    Please watch for your invitation to our annual Patron's Party. Time and location to be announced.

    Pre-Show Wine & Cheese Event

    We invite all BLT patrons (Benefactor level, Star level, Gold level, and Sustaining level) to join us in the Ruth Langston garden for a pre-show wine & cheese gathering on each opening night from 6:30 pm until 7:15 pm.

    Class Act Summer Workshops

    Registration for workshops will take place the first day of classes.
    Fees: $125 for one child; $95 for each additional

    Our 2016-2017 Season

    Rabbit Hole

    Rabbit Hole

    September 22-24, 2016 at 7:30 p.m.
    September 25, 2016 at 2:30 p.m.
    Reservations for public begin September 16, 2016

    read more


    Meet Me in St. Louis

    Performance dates:

    December 1-3, 2016 at 7:30 p.m.
    December 4, 2016 at 2:30 p.m.
    Reservations for public begin November 25, 2016

    read more


    Our Town

    Performance dates:

    March 2-4, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.
    March 5, 2017 at 2:30 p.m.
    Reservations for public begin February 24, 2017

    read more


    The Savannah Sipping Society

    Performance dates:

    May 4-6, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.
    May 7, 2017 at 2:30 p.m.
    Reservations for public begin April 28, 2017

    read more


    Class Act

    Performance dates:

    Children's Performance Dates:
    June 17-18, 2016 at 7:00pm
    June 19, 2016 at 2:30pm

    Teens' Performance Dates:
    July 15-16, 2016 at 7:00pm
    July 17, 2016 at 2:30pm

    read more
  • Volunteering

    Any member of the community may volunteer in one of many areas: backstage, set construction, door workers, garden maintenance, props, costumes, building maintenance, etc. Simply call us at (229) 246-8345 or email us and we will get you involved!

    Donations

    Bainbridge Little Theatre is always interested in donations of usable, unique and vintage clothing, furniture, and other items. Please email with your items and we will let you know when and where to drop them off!

    Member Donors

    $1,000.00

    Benefactor

    Individual or Cooperate support receives four (4) season tickets, recognition in the lobby, plus Sustaining Patron benefits.


    $500.00

    Star Patron

    Star Patrons receive two (2) season tickets, recognition in our lobby, and Sustaining Patron benefits.


    $125.00

    Gold Patron

    Gold Patrons receive one (1) season ticket, recognition in our lobby, as well as receiving Sustaining Patron benefits.


    $80.00

    Sustaining Patron

    Sustaining Patrons receive one (1) season ticket. They join us at the Annual Patron’s Party, at the wine and cheese festivities before every opening night, and are celebrated in our programs.


    $60.00

    Patron

    Patrons receive one (1) season ticket. They join us at the Annual Patron’s party and are celebrated in our programs.


    $50.00

    Subscriber

    Subscribers receive one (1) season ticket. Our Subscribers are greatly appreciated.


    $25.00

    Student

    Students receive one (1) season ticket (must show student ID). Student (full-time) available to grade school, high school and college students. BHS students receive credit in English class for attending plays.

  • Youth Gallery

     

    2012

    Cinderella
    Cinderella
    Cinderella
    Cinderella
    Cinderella
    Cinderella
    Cinderella
    Cinderella

     

    2005

    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
    Crazy for You
  • Children's Gallery

     

    2013

    On the Tip of My Tongue
    On the Tip of My Tongue
    On the Tip of My Tongue
  • Auditions

    Bainbridge Little Theatre is a great place to learn and grow your artisitc talents. Auditions are open to all interested parties, and no prior experience is needed. Come and join us and realize there is no fear in what we do, only fun and pleasant experiences. For more information, contact us at (229) 246-8345 or email us at bainbridgelittletheatre@gmail.com.



    Auditions for Rabbit Hole

    by David Lindsay-Abaire; directed by Richard Whitehead

    Becca and Howie Corbett have everything a family could want, until a life-shattering accident turns their world upside down and leaves the couple drifting perilously apart. Rabbit Hole charts their bittersweet search for comfort in the darkest of places and for a path that will lead them back into the light of day.


    Characters
    Becca - a grieving mother in her late thirties or early forties. Tough and uncompromising, she cannot tolerate insincerity or impracticality.
    Howie - Becca’s husband, a patient man who specializes in pretending everything is fine.
    Izzy - Becca’s younger sister, in her late twenties or early thirties. A perennial party girl who never grew up, Izzy is still trying to find herself.
    Nat - Becca and Izzy’s mother, an opinionated alcoholic with a knack for sticking her foot in her mouth.
    Jason - an awkward and nerdy seventeen-year-old boy who accidentally killed Becca and Howie’s son when the little boy ran in front of his car.


    Auditions: August 8-9, 2016 at 7:00 pm

    Rehearsals begin: TBA

    Performances: September 22-24, 2016 at 7:30 pm
    September 25, 2016 at 2:30 pm




    Auditions for Meet Me in St. Louis

    Songs by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane; Book by Hugh Wheeler; Directed by Martha Mobley; Musical Direction by Michael Inlow

    Based on the heartwarming film of the same name, Meet Me In St. Louis takes audience members on a musical journey back to the early 1900’s, on the brink of the 1904 World’s Fair. In the show’s center are the Smiths, a humble middle-class family made up of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, their four daughters Rose, Esther, Agnes, and Tootie, and their son Lon. With the addition of romantic suitors, comedic misunderstandings, and jovial pranks, this musical is filled with nonstop entertainment featuring memorable musical numbers such as “The Boy Next Door”, “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas”, and “A Day In New York”.


    Characters
    Rose Smith - Female Lead (Mezzo-Soprano) - beautiful and chic daughter, about eighteen
    Esther Smith - Female Lead (Alto) - lively and attractive daughter, about seventeen
    John Truitt - Male Lead (Baritone) - handsome, athletic boy next door, about nineteen
    Mr. Alonso Smith - Male Supporting (Baritone) - fortyish, father and lawyer
    Mrs. Anna Smith - Female Supporting (Alto) - fortyish, good and loving mother
    Lon Smith - Male Supporting (Tenor) - good-looking, nineteen-year-old Princeton freshman
    Agnes Smith - Female Supporting (Mezzo-Soprano) - tomboyish twelve-year-old daughter
    Tootie Smith - Female Supporting - bright six-year-old daughter
    Grandpa Prophater - Male Supporting (Baritone) - Mrs. Smith’s father, a Civil War veteran
    Katie - Female Supporting (Alto) - the Smiths’ cook and housemaid, Irish and about fifty
    Warren Sheffield - Male Supporting (Baritone) - Rose’s suitor, an eligible young man from a rich family
    Lucille Ballard - Female - a sophisticated and charming young lady
    Ensemble

    Please come with a musical theatre audition piece that's at least 16 measures long.


    Auditions: October 3-4, 2016 at 7:00 pm

    Rehearsals begin: TBA

    Performances: December 1-3, 2016 at 7:30 pm
    December 4, 2016 at 2:30 pm




    Auditions for Our Town

    by Thornton Wilder; directed by Richard Whitehead

    Speculated by many to be the greatest of all American musicals, Gypsy tells the story of the dreams and efforts of one hungry, powerhouse of a woman to get her two daughters into show business.


    Characters
    Stage Manager - The host of the play and the dramatic equivalent of an omniscient narrator. The Stage Manager exercises control over the action of the play, cueing the other characters, interrupting their scenes with his own interjections, and informing the audience of events and objects that we cannot see. Although referred to only as Stage Manager and not by a name, he occasionally assumes other roles, such as an old woman, a druggist, and a minister. Interacting with both the world of the audience and the world of the play’s characters, he occupies a godlike position of authority.
    George Gibbs - Dr. and Mrs. Gibbs’s son. A decent, upstanding young man, George is a high school baseball star who plans to attend the State Agricultural School after high school. His courtship of Emily Webb and eventual marriage to her is central to the play’s limited narrative action. Wilder uses George and Emily’s relationship to ponder the questions of love and marriage in general.
    Emily Webb - Mr. and Mrs. Webb’s daughter and Wally’s older sister. Emily is George’s schoolmate and next-door neighbor, then his fiancée, and later his wife. She is an excellent student and a conscientious daughter. After dying in childbirth, Emily joins the group of dead souls in the local cemetery and attempts to return to the world of the living. Her realization that human life is precious because it is fleeting is perhaps the central message of the play.
    Dr. Gibbs - George’s father and the town doctor. Dr. Gibbs is also a Civil War expert. His delivery of twins just before the play opens establishes the themes of birth, life, and daily activity. He and his family are neighbors to the Webbs.
    Mrs. Gibbs - George’s mother and Dr. Gibbs’s wife. Mrs. Gibbs’s desire to visit Paris—a wish that is never fulfilled—suggests the importance of seizing the opportunities life presents, rather than waiting for things to happen. At the same time, Mrs. Gibbs’s wish for the luxurious trip ultimately proves unnecessary in her quest to appreciate life.
    Mr. Webb - Emily’s father and the publisher and editor of the Grover’s Corners Sentinel. Mr. Webb’s report to the audience in Act I is both informative and interactive, as his question-and-answer session draws the audience physically into the action of the play.
    Mrs. Webb - Emily’s mother and Mr. Webb’s wife. At first a no-nonsense woman who does not cry on the morning of her daughter’s marriage, Mrs. Webb later shows her innocent and caring nature, worrying during the wedding that she has not taught her daughter enough about marriage.
    Mrs. Soames - A gossipy woman who sings in the choir along with Mrs. Webb and Mrs. Gibbs. Mrs. Soames appears in the group of dead souls in Act III. One of the few townspeople we meet outside of the Webb and Gibbs families, Mrs. Soames offers a sense of the interrelated nature of the lives of the citizens of Grover’s Corners.
    Simon Stimson - The choirmaster, whose alcoholism and undisclosed “troubles” have been the subject of gossip in Grover’s Corners for quite some time. Wilder uses Mr. Stimson’s misfortunes to explore the limitations of small town life. Mr. Stimson appears in the group of dead souls in Act III, having committed suicide by hanging himself in his attic. He is perhaps most notable for his short speech in Act III, when he says that human existence is nothing but “[i]gnorance and blindness.”
    Rebecca Gibbs - George’s younger sister. Rebecca’s role is minor, but she does have one very significant scene with her brother. Her remarks in Act I—about the location of Grover’s Corners in the universe—articulate an important theme in the play: if the town is a microcosm, representative of the broader human community and the shared human experience, then this human experience of Grover’s Corners lies at the center of a grand structure and is therefore eternal.
    Wally Webb - Emily’s younger brother. Wally is a minor figure, but he turns up in Act III among the group of dead souls. Wally dies young, the result of a burst appendix on a Boy Scout trip. His untimely death underscores the brief and fleeting nature of life.
    Howie Newsome - The local milkman. Howie’s reappearance during every morning scene—once each in Acts I, II, and III—highlights the continuity of life in Grover’s Corners and in the general human experience.
    Joe Crowell, Jr. - The paperboy. Joe’s routine of delivering papers to the same people each morning emphasizes the sameness of daily life in Grover’s Corners. We see this sameness continue when Joe’s younger brother, Si, takes over the route for him. Despite this sameness, however, each of the conversations Joe has while on his route is unique, suggesting that while his activities are monotonous, daily life is not.
    Si Crowell - Joe’s younger brother, also a paperboy. Si’s assumption of his brother’s former job contributes to the sense of constancy that characterizes Grover’s Corners throughout the play.
    Professor Willard - A professor at the State University who gives the audience a report on Grover’s Corners. Professor Willard appears once and then disappears. His role in the play is to interact with the audience and to inform theatergoers of the specifics of life in Grover’s Corners. His reference to Native Americans reflects Wilder’s understanding that the European ancestors of the current population in Grover’s Corners replaced and extinguished the existing Native American populations.
    Constable Warren - A local policeman. Constable Warren keeps a watchful eye over the community. His personal knowledge of and favor with the town’s citizens bespeaks the close-knit nature of the town.
    Sam Craig - Emily Webb’s cousin, who has left Grover’s Corners to travel west, but returns for her funeral in Act III. Though originally from the town, Sam has the air of an outsider. His unawareness of the events that have occurred in Grover’s Corners during his absence parallels the audience’s own unawareness.
    Joe Stoddard - The town undertaker. Joe prepares Emily’s grave and remarks on how sad it is to bury young people. This statement emphasizes a theme that grows ever more apparent throughout the play and receives its most explicit discussion in Act III: the transience of human life.


    Auditions: January 9-10, 2017 at 7:00 pm

    Rehearsals begin: TBA

    Performances: March 2-4, 2017 at 7:30 pm
    March 5, 2017 at 2:30 pm




    Auditions for The Savannah Sipping Society

    by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope, and Jamie Wooten; directed by Michael Inlow

    In this delightful, laugh-a-minute comedy, four unique Southern women, all needing to escape the sameness of their day-to-day routines, are drawn together by Fate—and an impromptu happy hour—and decide it’s high time to reclaim the enthusiasm for life they’ve lost through the years.


    Characters
    Randa - a perfectionist and workaholic who is struggling to cope with an unexpected career derailment.
    Dot - After the loss of her husband and their retirement plans, Dot is facing the disconcerting idea of starting over alone.
    Marlafaye - Good ol’ Texas gal Marlafaye has come to Savannah on the heels of losing her tom cattin’ husband to a 23-year-old dental hygienist.Not only is she seeking to start a new life but also wreak revenge on her ex.
    Jinx - Also new to town is the fiery Jinx, who offers her services as a life coach to the women; however, while she’s busy trying to get their lives back on track, she overlooks her own need for some sage advice.


    Auditions: March 13-14, 2017 at 7:00 pm

    Rehearsals begin: TBA

    Performances: May 4-6, 2017 at 7:30 pm
    May 7, 2017 at 2:30 pm

  • Contact Address

    Bainbridge Little Theatre

    220 East Troupe Street,
    Bainbridge, GA 39817
    Telephone: (229) 246-8345
    E-mail: bainbridgelittletheatre@gmail.com

    Contact Form

  • Privacy Policy

    What information do we collect?

    We collect information from you when you register on our site or fill out a form.

    When ordering or registering on our site, as appropriate, you may be asked to enter your name or e-mail address. You may, however, visit our site anonymously.


    What do we use your information for?

    Any of the information we collect from you may be used in one of the following ways:

    • To improve customer service (your information helps us to more effectively respond to your customer service requests and support needs).
    • To process transactions. Your information, whether public or private, will not be sold, exchanged, transferred, or given to any other company for any reason whatsoever, without your consent, other than for the express purpose of delivering the purchased product or service requested by the customer.
    • To send periodic emails. The email address you provide for order processing may be used to send you information and updates pertaining to your order, in addition to receiving occasional company news, updates, related product or service information, etc.


    How do we protect your information?

    We implement a variety of security measures to maintain the safety of your personal information when you access your personal information.


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  • More

    Board of Directors Officers

    Richard Whitehead (Chair)
    Shanell Schuyler (Vice Chair)
    Michael Inlow (Secretary)
    Bonnie Porter (Treasurer)

    Board of Directors

    Pamela Barnes, Ariel Brock, Eric Brock, Hildy Conder, Rachael Crager,
    Scott Dunn, Arley Fisher, Shelley Fisher, Kellie Gay, Christina Greene,
    Tina Greene, Michael Inlow, Martha Mobley, Dave Nelson,
    Bonnie Porter, Shanell Schuyler, Lori Shiver, James Spooner, and Richard Whitehead.

  • Rabbit Hole

    by David Lindsay-Abaire; directed by Richard Whitehead

    September 22-24, 2016 at 7:30 p.m.
    September 25, 2016 at 2:30 p.m.


    Rabbit Hole

    Becca and Howie Corbett have everything a family could want, until a life-shattering accident turns their world upside down and leaves the couple drifting perilously apart. Rabbit Hole charts their bittersweet search for comfort in the darkest of places and for a path that will lead them back into the light of day.

  • Meet Me in St. Louis

    Songs by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane; Book by Hugh Wheeler; Directed by Martha Mobley; Musical Direction by Michael Inlow

    December 1-3, 2016 at 7:30 pm
    December 4, 2016 at 2:30 pm


    Meet Me in St. Louis

    Meet Me in St. Louis is a rare treasure in the musical theatre and is based on the heartwarming movie. Join the Smith family at the 1904 World’s Fair, and see how their love and respect for each other is tempered with the genuine humor that can only be generated by such a special family. Memorable musical numbers include The Boy Next Door, A Raving Beauty, The Trolley Song, Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, Whenever I’m with You, and A Day in New York.

  • Our Town

    by Thornton Wilder; directed by Richard Whitehead

    March 2-4, 2017 at 7:30 pm
    March 5, 2017 at 2:30 pm


    Our Town

    Described by Edward Albee as "...the greatest American play ever written," the story follows the small town of Grover's Corners through three acts: "Daily Life," "Love and Marriage," and "Death and Eternity." Narrated by a stage manager and performed with minimal props and sets, audiences follow the Webb and Gibbs families as their children fall in love, marry, and eventually—in one of the most famous scenes in American theatre—die. Thornton Wilder's final word on how he wanted his play performed is an invaluable addition to the American stage and to the libraries of theatre lovers internationally.

  • The Savannah Sipping Society

    by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope, and Jamie Wooten; directed by Michael Inlow

    May 4-6, 2017 at 7:30 pm
    May 7, 2017 at 2:30 pm


    The Savannah Sipping Society

    In this delightful, laugh-a- minute comedy, four unique Southern women, all needing to escape the sameness of their day-to- day routines, are drawn together by Fate—and an impromptu happy hour—and decide it’s high time to reclaim the enthusiasm for life they’ve lost through the years. Over the course of six months, filled with laughter, hilarious misadventures, and the occasional liquid refreshment, these middle-aged women successfully bond and find the confidence to jumpstart their new lives. Together, they discover lasting friendships and a renewed determination to live in the moment—and most importantly, realize it’s never too late to make new old friends.

  • Perfect Wedding

    by Robin Hawdon; directed by Pamela Barnes

    May 5-7, 2016 at 7:30 pm
    May 8, 2016 at 2:30 pm


    Perfect Wedding

    An appalling situation: a bridegroom wakes on his wedding morning in his own bridal suite, with his bride-to-be about to arrive any moment, and finds a strange girl in bed beside him, whom he can't remotely remember even having been introduced to. Worse - during the ensuing panic to get the stranger dressed and out of the way, the bride arrives and the girl is trapped in the bathroom. The only way out of the dilemma is to persuade the best man to pretend that the hidden girl is his girlfriend. Then the problem is that the best man's real girlfriend has to be kept ignorant of the fact. By the time the bride's parents and half the hotel staff get in on the act, the chaos reaches nuclear proportions!

  • Class Act

    Children's show: Princess Who
    Director: Heather Phillips
    Rehearsals begin May 31, 2016; 9am - noon Mon-Fri
    Performance Dates: June 17-18, 2016 at 7:00pm
    June 19, 2016 at 2:30pm

    Teens' show: Little Mermaid Jr
    Director: Ida Cooksey
    Rehearsals begin June 20, 2016; 6:30pm - 9:30pm Mon-Fri
    Performance Dates: July 15-16, 2016 at 7:00pm
    July 17, 2016 at 2:30pm


    Class Act

    Class Act Children (ages 6-12) and Class Act Youth (ages 13-18) are acting workshops that usually last 3 weeks during the summer. Participants learn acting, vocal and movement techniques, as well as perform in a showcase at the end of the camp. The Children rehearse in the morning; the Youth in the evening.

    No early registration. Registration will be the first day of classes. Fees: $125 for one child $95 for each additional.
    Download the registration form or complete the Children's online form and/or the Teens' online form.